tabula rasa
tabula rasa
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nevver:

Serious Business
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"When childhood dies, its corpses are called adults and they enter society, one of the politer names of hell. That is why we dread children, even if we love them, they show us the state of our decay."
Brian Aldiss (via leslieseuffert)
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thejogging:

Proposal for a Pixar/Wes Anderson Collobarative movie that involves a ragtag group of orphaned/misfit fruits who go on a quest to find their families, fail, but eventually come to realize that they’ve become a family, and end up being used by Urs Fischer in his MOMA retrospective, 2013
film still
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"For just one second, look at your life and see how perfect it is. Stop looking for the next secret door that is going to lead you to your real life. Stop waiting. This is it: there’s nothing else. It’s here, and you’d better decide to enjoy it or you’re going to be miserable wherever you go, for the rest of your life, forever."
The Magicians by Lev Grossman (via lostinthesounds)
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"If I were to live a thousand years, I would belong to you for all of them. If we were to live a thousand lives, I would want to make you mine in each one."
The Evolution of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin (via lostinthesounds)
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Kiddy Pirate ^^
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lindafarrow:

Olga Kurylenko // The Row // Oblivion Press Tour
See more on The Diary http://bit.ly/10Z2Vq0
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art-dacity:


“Remember that the very best things in life can’t be captured in status updates.”

Author Shauna Niequist in “Stop Instagramming Your Perfect Life”
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Totoro and Mei re-united in a cable car on Flickr.
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"

In situations of high stress, fear or distrust, the hormone and neurotransmitter cortisol floods the brain. Executive functions that help us with advanced thought processes like strategy, trust building, and compassion shut down. And the amygdala, our instinctive brain, takes over. The body makes a chemical choice about how best to protect itself — in this case from the shame and loss of power associated with being wrong — and as a result is unable to regulate its emotions or handle the gaps between expectations and reality.

[…]

When you argue and win, your brain floods with different hormones: adrenaline and dopamine, which makes you feel good, dominant, even invincible. It’s a the feeling any of us would want to replicate. So the next time we’re in a tense situation, we fight again. We get addicted to being right.

"

The problematic chemistry of your brain on argument. Also see the science of the “winner effect.”

( The Dish)